Welcome Transliterate Librarians!

Welcome Transliterate Librarians! 

I am finally feeling the excitement shared by other members in EC&I 832  in the past few weeks with the completion of my final project! This has been a long process and I may have set out to accomplish a bigger task than anticipated, but I am extremely happy with the product!

I believe my website for transliterate librarians is a great resource that is user-friendly and allows teachers to integrate digital citizenship lessons through cross-curricular lessons. These lessons are not meant to add more work load to teachers, nor are they to be disconnected from the curriculum. They are created the enhance and transform lessons to help create and inspire digital leaders within in the classroom and to promote digital citizenship and media literacy.

The final product contains an opening page describing the websites purpose, four landing pages (inquiry and research, evaluating resources, creating and sharing, and digital citizenship), and 12 lessons to support transliteracy.

Although this project is completed at this stage in the game, it is far from over. It is my hope that with collaboration from fellow teacher librarians we will be able to add lessons to the database. If you would like to collaborate with me on it, please fill out the contact page on the weebly site and I will get in touch!

A special thanks for Jennifer Stewart-Mitchell and Genna Rodriguez for allowing me to use the Digital Citizenship Lesson plan page as found on my lessons. And a huge thank you to Joyce Valenza and Gwyneth Jones  for inspiring this project! Lastly, thank you to Alec Couros and Katia Hildebrandt for giving me guidance and introducing me to new and emerging ideas surrounding digital citizenship and media literacy, but also the freedom to make this project meaningful and authentic to me.

 

 

Advertisements

Introducing… Transliterate Librarians

Sands of Time

Photo Credit: ipsbmtc via Compfight cc

I am feeling very good about my final project. I feel like it is coming together nicely and I have enough time to complete it to the standard I would like. Although my website is not finished yet and is missing some of the lesson plans, I feel comfortable to share the link with you to explore the website and give me some feedback!

TL

www.transliteratelibrarians.weebly.com

Last week I finished the landing pages for my website and this week I continued developing and finalizing the lesson plans. I have completed and uploaded 4 lesson plans and have 8 more to go.

I have really enjoyed making the lesson plans as it has helped me gain a deeper understanding of how I can teach digital citizenship in school and how embedded the skills are in the renewed Saskatchewan curriculum.

This past week I created a lesson on Creative Commons with help from Common Sense Education and my own understanding of fair use has grown a great deal! I hope other teachers are able to use the site I am creating to integrate lessons into their teaching to not only create digital citizens, but also digital leaders!

Final Project Feedback

This week I was able to create (and hopefully finalize) the landing pages for my final project on Transliterate Librarians. I would love some feedback on what I have written… Have I provided enough information on each topic? Have I provided a good explanation on each topic? Do you feel the videos match what I am trying to explain in my writing or do they take away from it?

Thanks!

Opening Page

The role of the Teacher Librarian is changing. TLs are no longer the keepers of information, but rather media specialists and educational leaders. TLs collaborate with other teachers to implement engaging and innovative technologies to improve student learning, engage students in inquiry based learning to help develop multiple literacies, and teach students how to use technology to find information and with the information the ability extract and synthesize it to formulate new meaning.

The purpose of this website is to provide a comprehensive resource for TLs and teachers that includes lessons and resources on the four domains of what TLs teach according to Joyce Valenza and Gwyenth Jones.  The four domains as listed in the poster below are inquiry and research, evaluating resources, creating and sharing, and digital citizenship.

This website takes into account Ribble’s nine elements of digital citizenship, the Saskatchewan Digital Citizenship Continuum from K-12, Teaching in Education Framework, and RCSD’s Essential Skills of 21st Century Learning.

Please use the menu above to locate and access the lessons and more information on each domain.

Inquiry and Research

Inquiry is embedded across all renewed Saskatchewan curricula.  It can occur in many ways, in the moment, integrated in a lesson, planned as unit, within a subject area. Inquiry allows students to explore and engage in learning opportunities that fosters deep understanding. Inquiry encourages students to ask questions, perform investigations, and build new understandings. Research is a key piece to an effective inquiry as students are searching, synthesizing, and formulating new knowledge, meanings, and understandings. In addition, inquiry and research promotes reading and writing as students explore and formulate new knowledge.

Evaluating Resources

Students need the skills to locate, use, and evaluate information. While doing research, students should be able to choose an appropriate media outlet for their purpose, check the currency, relevance, authority, accuracy, and purpose of the information. It is essential for students to develop this skill at a young age as they are turning to the technology to access information and learn new concepts. However, they need the digital literacies of how to use technology effectively, such as navigating the web appropriately, keeping track of sources for reference, using search engines and keywords successfully, and ensuring information is accurate and reliable.

 

Creating and Sharing

Creating and sharing are important components of transliteracy as they give learning a purpose, an audience, and allow for connections. Through creating and sharing students should appreciate literature in all media forms. It is important not to get distracted by the “bells and whistles” of things and to remember your purpose. Through creating and sharing students are taught how to communicate their message. They are also encouraged to be critical thinkers about media messages that are presented to them. Creating and sharing can be done through a PLE or PLN and allows student to express themselves authentically and purposefully.

Digital Citizenship

Digital citizenship is an essential skill in transliteracy. Often it is assumed that because students are young, they are digital natives; however, they need to explicitly be taught digital citizenship. They need to understand that other people have created and own content that is posted online and it is important to attribute their work appropriately. This can be started at a very young age by just writing the author and title of a book and it will grow from there. As well, students should know the difference between copying, remixing, creating, and sharing whilst developing the skills of content curation and how to use creative commons. Additionally students need to manage their digital footprint and realize what they post online is available widely, therefore they need to protect their online identity. Lastly, students need to be respectful online, respectful of themselves and respectful of others.

Process > Product

The process is equally, if not more important than the product. I know, I know… but I still have trouble sharing my process as it tends to be messy as I work through things to get to the shiny finished product at the end. And in this mess, although it might not make sense to you (as it is the way I organize my process), I tend to learn a lot!

Eureka California

Photo Credit: BCOL CCCP via Compfight cc

This week I decided to do a screen capture to update on my major project. I am chugging along and it may be a bit slower than I anticipated, but I am pleased with my progress so far and excited to share my resources with others once complete!

It’s the 5 week countdown…

5 weeks of class left. 15 hours of final project complete, approximately 35 hours to go. I have been gathering resources for my final project and have been working to compile lesson plans that are relevant and will be used. After all, what is the point of creating something without a purpose?16226078303

I have decided I would create 3 lesson plans for each of my categories:

  1. Inquiry & Research
  2. Evaluating Resources
  3. Creating & Sharing
  4. Digital Citizenship

My hope is this website will continue to grow and evolve as my role as a Teacher-Librarian evolves, but this will be a substantial amount of resources to get one started in teaching transliteracy.

 “Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks.”

Thomas, S. with Joseph, C., Laccetti, J., Mason, B., Mills, S., Perril, S., and Pullinger, K. Transliteracy: Crossing divides, First Monday, Volume 12 Number 12 – 3 December 2007.

The lessons I have begun digging deeper into are:

  1. Inquiry & Research
    1. How to analyze & synthesize selected information.
    2. How to design an effective query.
    3. How to effectively find & use information to solve problems & make decisions.
  1. Evaluating Resources
    1. How to deconstruct/construct media messages.
    2. How to find, discern & make sense of divergent perspectives.
    3. Who is an expert?
  1. Creating & Sharing
    1. How to connect research/knowledge to real-world needs and make a difference.
    2. How not to present.
    3. What is the best medium to digitally tell or publish a story?
  1. Digital Citizenship
    1. What is Creative Commons? How to attribute credit.
    2. How to develop an academic digital footprint.
    3. How to manage a digital reputation.

I have decided to a use a weebly to create and manage my website for the product portion of my final project. The reason I chose weebly is I find it extremely user-friendly to this type of project and we are using weebly as a host to our library websites within RCSD.

tltls

The next 35 hours (I am guessing it will be more) will be a lot of work, but well worth it as I believe this resource will connect directly with curriculum, will meet the needs of integrating the digital citizenship continuum, and will be useful to TLs and Teachers.

And now that I am feeling a little stressed, here is an Ode to Librarians to lighten the mood!

The wheels are starting to turn

This week has been a huge progress week for me as I tackled some “big idea” questions for my final project. I was fortunate to attend two very relevant PD sessions this week within our school division which have helped guide the way I would like my final project to go.

Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools

The Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship via Digital Citizenship Education in Saskatchewan Schools

The first session was on Digital Citizenship and the Balanced Approach to Learning. We looked at the role of digital

technologies in education, the essential skills for 21st century learning, and the digital citizenship continuum. We then had a chance to create a lesson that integrated 21st century essential skills and digital citizenship concepts and skills. As I was looking through the digital citizenship continuum, I thought this would be a perfect place for me to start with my lessons for my final project as I could integrate the 9 elements of digital citizenship with my transliteracy lessons. With permission from Jennifer Stewart-Mitchell and Genna Rodriguez, I am able to use the lesson plan format they created to create the lessons for my Transliterate Librarians Website (which is still very much a work in progress… Stay tuned for a draft publication!).

I am very excited about this breakthrough because I believe by collaborating with other professionals in our school division, we will create resources that will have a purpose and be used and shared with others within the school division. The lesson I created (Boutilier – Digital Citizenship Lesson Planning Framework / Animal Research Report), ties in directly with the inquiry and research section of my website. It is an expository writing lesson (for grade 2) which uses online databases to research an animal and write a report.

RCSD 21st Century Skills

RCSD 21st Century Skills via RCSD Digital Consultants

The second session was our TL EdCamp. This was my first year participating in the TL EdCamp, but I came out of the sessions feeling renewed and refreshed! It is so great learning from your peers and being able to participate in a conference in a non-traditional way. I went to a session on Genius Hour/ Maker Space where we focused on the book Invent to Learn.  The next session was on a new resource from National Geographic Learning, which focused on 21st century reading: creative thinking and reading with TED Talks. We looked through this resource and connected it to the Saskatchewan curriculum. I am really looking forward to working with teachers and this resource. The next session was Social Media in the Library. This session had some heated debate on digital citizenship and whether using social media in the library and in schools was ok or not. We also talked about the media release form and how perhaps it needed to be updated to reflect social media. The last session was about using tools such as Kahoot and Quizizz to engage students in review.

This week has helped me kick start my final project… I am excited to see how it progresses over the next month.

“Digital Citizenship is more than just a teaching tool, it is a way to prepare students for a society full of technology.”

– Dr. Mike Ribble

It’s all about the process…

Initially I had decided to do the internet-based social activism project as my final project; however, I ran into some glitches with the class I was going to work with and decided I would rather do this a personal project than a final project for this class. I am still very passionate about bringing our AR program outside of the school and in turn make a larger impact on the school community. Our school has applied for the I Am Stronger grant and is still actively present on our blog and twitter. Follow us at @heart_library.

Photo Credit: charlywkarl via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: charlywkarl via Compfight cc

I am VERY excited about implementing and creating my new project that will directly relate to my new role as a Teacher Librarian. This position interested me because the role of the teacher-librarian with RCSD is evolving. It is my hope that through this position, I will be able to collaborate with other teachers to implement engaging and innovative technologies to improve student learning, engage students in inquiry based learning to help develop multiple literacies, and teach students how to use technology to find information and with the information the ability extract and synthesize it to formulate new meaning. That being said, I think my final project will help me achieve my goals as TL.

What I would like to do is create a webpage based on the ideas on an image created by Joyce Valenza and Gwyneth Jones. I was amazed when I tweeted this image and my twitter account blew up! This image combined with the proper hashtags gave me the most action I have ever seen on twitter. It had around 100 retweets or favourites and I gained a plethora of followers. This gave me confidence that pursuing a final project based on the evolving role of the TL would not only have importance to me, but also others. As I said, part of the reason I left the classroom and took on the role of the TL was so that I could be involved with helping other teachers and students with transliteracy and I think this project will help me accomplish that.

My final project will be a webpage that is a comprehensive resource for TLs and teachers that includes lessons and resources on the four domains as listed in the poster (inquiry/research, evaluating resources, creating & sharing, and digital citizenship). Specifically I would like to focus my lessons on the Gr. 1-5 range. This website will have lessons, ideas, and resources that address the bullet points listed on the poster. My next step is to start gathering resources, developing lesson plans, and creating a practical resource for TLs to help develop transliteracy.

Major Project Thoughts

I was very interested in the internet-based social activism project after it was explained in class. It is my first year at Sacred Heart Community School in Regina and I believe this project will have a great impact on our school community. This summer as I was preparing for school, I asked one of the veteran teachers at our school, Adam Ward, if there had been a chosen theme for AR in our school. Accelerated Reader (AR) is a reading program where students read a book then take an online quiz to earn points. Most schools in Regina Catholic School Division have an AR program, but I have learned none have the same impact as the one at Sacred Heart.

Students at Sacred Heart take great pride in reading books, setting goals, and achieving their goals. Students are rewarded at various levels and once they reach 100 points, they are awarded a themed t-shirt.IMG_3360

“The shirts are yellow: It is our school colour, it is the same colour as the sun which is the highest point in the First Nations world view, and it is not a gang colour in North Central…in fact it is associated within the community as a reading colour now” (Adam Ward, Sacred Heart School).

To some it may seem like just a shirt, but to our school community, it is much more. The AR committee has described the past shirts below:

AREagle feathers are a sign of honour.  Many years ago eagle feathers were presented to acknowledge great accomplishments among First Nations people.  For the past four years all of our 100 point t-shirts have included an eagle feather in recognition of the importance of 100 AR points.  100 is forever. The feathers are also a reminder that our reading is not only for us but helps our community as well.

Elder Mike Pinay has told us that “Education is the new buffalo”.  For many years the great herds of buffalo provided many of the basic necessities of living in Saskatchewan.  The First Peoples relied on the buffalo to survive and thrive.  Today people in Saskatchewan are sustained by their education, making it the new buffalo.  When we succeed in reading we are taking control of our own lives, helping our community to thrive.

Inukshuk have been used in the vast lands of Northern Canada to guide travelers and to mark fertile hunting and fishing areas.  By earning our AR points we are creating landmarks that help us guide our lives to where we want them to go.  Being a community of readers we are also guides for everyone all around us, setting an example of how we can succeed and follow our own path to success.

The Métis infinity symbol represents the joining of two cultures and the existence of a people forever.  Our infinity symbol reminds us that when we earn our 100 points that it can never be taken away from us.  We combine our AR reading with the rest of our education to create a foundation that will stay with us for the rest of our lives.  Our infinity means we make our own choices and go where we want to go.

This year, the shirt has a totem pole on the front that incorporates the four previous symbols into the structure of the pole.  Totem poles are traditional more to the west coast First Nations, but is a significant Aboriginal symbol within Canadian culture.  The sleeves have 100 on them and the back has the RCMP logo, our school 100 point logo and the wording “Working Together Strengthens Us All”.

“AR isn’t just reading at our school.  It’s an anti-gang strategy, cultural education and a community builder.  We run reading contests throughout the year but we make sure students celebrate themselves and each other, competition is a motivator but accomplishment is the take away.  One person getting 100 doesn’t mean another person can’t so one person’s accomplishment is everyone’s accomplishment” (Adam Ward, Sacred Heart School).

Bookmarks are awarded weekly to students as they make their way to 100 points, at 10, 25, and 50 points and beyond 100 points. Teachers are also encouraged to participate in AR.

On top of reading during school hours, we also host a monthly reading night where staff and the RCMP come into the school to read with students and their families. This is allowing for positive connections between students, families, and the greater community.

So what does this have to do with internet-based social activism?

I have created a Sacred Heart Library Website where our accomplishments will be highlighted through pictures, videos, and blog posts. Additionally, our school library has just set up a twitter account (heart_library) where students will take on a leadership role and post how they are reading with younger students in our school to help them achieve their goals. The hashtag #100isforever will be used as our hashtag campaign.

I plan to apply for the #iamstronger grant as well. I understand that this initiative doesn’t directly address bullying or cyberbullying, but I think it connects on a bigger level to creating a culture within our community to help students become readers, set and achieve goals, and help others to achieve their goals.

What are your thoughts? Does this achieve the goal of the internet-based social activism project as listed on the syllabus?